Fellowship Winners 2005

M A R T I N D U B E R M A N F E L L OW S H I P
E. Patrick Johnson is Associate Professor of Performance Studies and African American Studies
and Director of Graduate Studies at Northwestern University. His research project, Sweet Tea: An
Oral History of Black Gay Men of the South, examines the oral histories of black gay men who were
born, raised, and continue to reside in the South. Gathering oral histories from black gay men
between the ages of 19 and 93 from states that were a part of the confederacy, Johnson tries to
fill a void in the historical accounts of racialized sexual minorities in the South. Ultimately,
Johnson hopes that this project will complicate gay histories that suggest that gay subcultures
flourished mostly in northern, urban, industrial cities, by theorizing the South as a “vital”
subculture and reconsidering this region as “backward” and “repressive” when clearly gay
community building and desire emerge simultaneously from within and against southern culture.
(Honorable Mention) Jim Hubbard received a Duberman Award honorable mention for
the “ACT UP Oral History Project,” an archive of interviews with ACT UP organizers. Interview
transcripts and video clips of the project can be seen at www.actuporalhistory.org.
J O A N H E L L E R – D I A N E B E R N A R D F E L L OW S H I P
Amy Steinbugler is a Ph.D. candidate in Sociology at Temple University. Her dissertation,
entitled ‘Race Has Always Been More Than Just Race’: Gender, Sexuality and the Negotiation of
Race in Interracial Relationships, considers how queer and heterosexual black-white interracial
couples experience racial difference in their relationship. Situating her research at the
intersection of racial, gender and sexual identities, Steinbugler explores the empirical and
theoretical void created when scholars of race assume that interracial intimacy is heterosexual
and sexuality scholars assume that queer intimacy is monoracial. She seeks both to illuminate
queer interraciality as a productive site for analyzing intersecting identities and power
structures and to problematize the normative heterosexual framework through which
interracial sexuality has traditionally been examined.
Tim Retzloff is an undergraduate student of non-traditional age in the History Honors
Program at the University of Michigan, where he works full time as a supervisor at the Harlan
Hatcher Graduate Library. His research on various aspects of Michigan queer history has
appeared in GLQ, The Encyclopedia of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History in America,
the anthology Creating a Place for Ourselves, and the newspaper Between The Lines, for which
he served as assistant editor in the mid-1990s. He is also the online curator of the web exhibit
Artifacts and Disclosures: Michigan’s LGBT Heritage. Retzloff’s project looks at suburbanization
and the growth of visible lesbian and gay communities in postwar Detroit, examining how the
urban/suburban divide in and around the Motor City served to partition sexuality as well as
race and class.
(Honorable Mention) Ellen Herman received a Heller-Bernard honorable mention for her
project “Toward a History of Gay Kinship in the United States: The Case of Child Adoption in
the Early Twentieth Century.” The project is a study of same-sex couples and gay individuals
in modern child adoption prior to the 1970s. Herman is Associate Professor of History at the
University of Oregon.
P AU L M O N E T T E – R O G E R H O R W I T Z D I S S E R TAT I O N P R I Z E
Jordan Schildcrout was awarded the 2005 Monette-Horwitz prize for his dissertation, This
Thing of Darkness: Reclaiming the Queer Killer in Contemporary Drama. Schildcrout completed
his Ph.D. in Theatre at the The Graduate Center, CUNY in May 2005. His dissertation analyzes “the
queer killer” as a frequently recurring character type in dramatic narratives. The study
examines the homophobic paradigm that imagines sexual nonconformity as criminal,
destructive, and evil, but also aims to deepen and enrich our understanding of plays featuring
queer killers by interpreting them as complex works of imagination that trade on metaphor
and fantasy to entertain, provoke emotion and thought, and illuminate queer experience.

With a large
number of
qualified and
impressive applications
to consider, deciding
on winners was, as
always, a difficult
process for the CLAGS
fellowship committee.
CLAGS is delighted to
recognize and support
some of the exciting
new work being done
in the field of queer
studies represented by
this year’s winners.
Again we send out
special thanks to the
generous supporters
who helped make these
awards possible, particularly
CLAGS founder
Martin Duberman,
Diane Bernard, Joe
Wittreich, and all the
individual contributors
to our fellowships
programs.